Paying Attention Now

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markishajubilee:

cocobaby23:

deallay:

lightspeedsound:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

Did Katy Perry just do a "geisha" performance at the American Music Awards? Yes. Complete with “geisha” costume (with slits up to the butt), stunted pseudo-Asian dance/walking, cartoon Kabuki makeup on her backup dancers, lots of fans, people in “Oriental” costumes beating drums, rice paper screens, and blown-up versions of the cheap paper umbrellas you put in your drinks.

Is it racist as fuck? Yes.
Is it the worst thing ever? Also yes. 
Did the song have ANYTHING to do with Asian culture? No. 

Is she the first pop princess to pull this shit? Absolutely not (for further reference, see Rihanna/Coldplay’s “Princess of China” and Gwen Stefani’s L.A.M.B. phase)

what. the. fuck.

no. katy no. 

oh dear lord save us.

I’m starting to understand why Russell left her ass

Presidential Proclamation -- National Family Week, 2013 | The White House

This is what progress and change looks like: “Whether united by blood or bonds of kinship — whether led by a mother and father, same-sex couple, single parent, or guardian — families are the building blocks of American society. During National Family Week, we celebrate the spirit that moves family members to care for one another, to grow and dream together, and to instill in their children the character that keeps our Nation strong.”

Freddie Mercury died 22 years ago on this day in 1991. Here’s a old video from a drag Halloween party a few years back to mark the date.  

Louise Erdrich wins the American Book Award for The Round House. Loved this book! 

Louise Erdrich wins the American Book Award for The Round House. Loved this book! 

Lalla
Rokia Traoré

feregjarat:

A M A Z I N G

At the Cedar tomorrow night! Can’t wait. Love the Mpls music scene.

You–or your handful of “feminist” sources–claim that first lady Obama is not a feminist because she says her most important job is being “mom-in-chief” to her two daughters…

You wring your hands about first lady Obama’s quote “safely and soothingly domestic” issues. You quote a feminist who “marvels that someone of the first lady’s ‘capacities and education has done so little of substance.‘ 

Given how simplistic your piece is, let me make this very simple: you are wrong.

- Melissa Harris-Perry in her open letter to Politico Magazine’s Michelle Cottle for her op-ed on Michelle Obama becoming a “feminist nightmare” (via msnbc)

I just logged into my Tumblr for the first time in a year and a half. Life is still beautiful and I *might want to blog a bit again so here I am…

I just logged into my Tumblr for the first time in a year and a half. Life is still beautiful and I *might want to blog a bit again so here I am…

nprfreshair:


TODAY is the 50th Anniversary of the beloved classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  First published in 1963, it has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.
The New York Times obituary for Maurice Sendak calls Where the Wild Things Are “simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making,” describing Sendak as being “…widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche.”

One of the most talked about interviews we’ve ever done was with Maurice Sendak in 2011 shortly before he died. Sendak reflects on love, loss, and celebrating life: 

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, The New York Times did an amazing illustration to accompany our emotional interview with Sendak. 

nprfreshair:

TODAY is the 50th Anniversary of the beloved classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  First published in 1963, it has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.

The New York Times obituary for Maurice Sendak calls Where the Wild Things Are “simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making,” describing Sendak as being “…widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche.”

One of the most talked about interviews we’ve ever done was with Maurice Sendak in 2011 shortly before he died. Sendak reflects on love, loss, and celebrating life:

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, The New York Times did an amazing illustration to accompany our emotional interview with Sendak. 

memeguy-com:

How the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers distract opposing kickers

memeguy-com:

How the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers distract opposing kickers

May 9

When Obama endorsed same-sex marriage…

whenobamaendorsed:

… my office was all:

The Carlton!